Inadequacies of threatened species laws across Australia

PYL report

An ANEDO report, prepared for the Places You Love Alliance, finds that threatened species and planning laws in Australian States and Territories fails to meet best practice standards.   Notwithstanding the continued inadequacies of state legislation, the Australian Government is poised to hand over assessment and approval powers as part of its one-stop shop policy.

See below for a summary of how State legislation compares with national standards.  To read the full report, click here.

ANEDO report - table

EDO BULLETIN 17 RELEASED

EDO-Tas-Logo-no-wordsThe latest edition of our Bulletin is now available.  This edition features information about the RET review, the anti-protest legislation, the repeal of the mining tax and the draft approval bilateral agreement… plus the usual details about opportunities to comment and upcoming events.  To subscribe to the Bulletin, click here.

Forestry legislation passes

Picton Valley - Rob Blakers

The Forestry (Rebuilding the Forest Industry) Act 2014 was passed on 2 September 2014.  The Act, which repeals the Tasmanian Forests Agreement Act 2013, was subject to a number of changes to accommodate special species timber harvesting.

A summary of these changes is available here. Click here for a briefing note of the final legislation.

Tasmanian budget 2014-2015

EDO-Tas-Logo-no-wordsThe Tasmanian government handed down the 2014-2015 budget today.  It’s a tight budget with cost savings primarily through reduced jobs, and without much positive news for the environment.  However, there has been a significant funding boost to the Parks and Wildlife Service to manage its large portfolio of reserves and a target set for a 50% increase in the number of reserves covered by management plans.

Notably, there is no additional funding to support environmental assessments, despite the additional responsibilities to be assumed by the Tasmanian government under the proposed bilateral agreements.  The budget papers also provide for the abolition of the Forest Practices Tribunal, Marine Farming Planning Review Panel and the Assessment Committee for Dam Construction without any indication of who will take on the statutory functions of those bodies.

Click here for our budget summary.

One-Stop Shop: Bilateral agreements in Tasmania

BilateralsThe Federal and Tasmanian governments have released a draft approval bilateral agreement for comment.  Under the agreement, developments that are approved by the State government under the Land Use Planning and Approvals Act 1993, Environmental Management and Pollution Control Act 1994 or the State Policies and Projects Act 1993 will no longer require approval from the Commonwealth Minister under the EPBC Act (creating a “one-stop shop” for environmental approvals).

Submissions in relation to the draft approval bilateral agreement can be made until 11 September 2014.

EDO Tasmania, EIANZ and the National Environmental Law Association are holding a discussion forum on 3 September 2014 looking at what bilateral agreements will mean for Tasmania.  How will the accreditation process work? Will assessments be quicker? Who will make decisions? Will
environmental standards be compromised?

Speakers include:

  • James Barker, Assistant Secretary, Regulatory Reform Taskforce, Department of Environment (Cth)
  • Alex Schaap, Director, Environment Protection Authority
  • Dr Chris McGrath, Barrister and Senior Lecturer in Environmental Regulation, University of Queensland (by video link)
  • Catherine Murdoch, Manager Environment, Tasmanian Irrigation
  • Peter McGlone, Tasmanian Conservation Trust

bilaterals logos           For details of this event, click here.

EDO Tasmania’s submission on the draft assessment bilateral

Explanatory document for the draft approval bilateral

ANEDO position paper on the one-stop shop approach

Dr Chris McGrath – A critical evaluation of the One-Stop Shop policy

EDO Bulletin 16 released

EDO Tas Logo - no wordsThe latest edition of our Bulletin is now available.  This edition features information about the draft approval bilateral agreement, the extension to the existing GMO moratorium and the new Species of National Environmental Significance Database … plus the usual details about opportunities to comment and upcoming events.  To subscribe to the Bulletin, click here.

North of the Sun

Film crowdEDO’s screening of North of the Sun, including a presentation by Matt Dell on the South West Marine Debris Clean Up, was a raging success – big thanks to Red Herring Surf, UTas, Wildcare Inc and Maria Island Walks for sponsoring the event.

For anyone who missed out, or who’d like to watch the film again, go to vimeo.com/ondemand/northofthesun/70019187. We’ll be organising northern screenings later in the year, so stay tuned…

Thanks also to our generous prize donors, Bonorong Wildlife Park, Cloudy Bay Cabins, Pennicott Wilderness tours, Red Herring Surf, Mick Lawrence and Simon Trewek.
(Image:  Thomas Moore)

EDO Bulletin 15 released

EDO-Tas-Logo-no-wordsThe latest edition of our Bulletin is now available.  This edition features information about the approval of Australia’s largest coal mine, the issuing of the largest financial penalty for an environmental offence and amendments to allow a larger development area on Mount Wellington… plus the usual details about opportunities to comment and upcoming events.  To subscribe to the Bulletin, click here.

EDO: helping Tasmanians protect their environment

Watch the last in our series of videos about our work – a compilation of stories about EDO Tasmania helping coastcare groups, environmental projects, rural communities and urban residents.

Launch: The Community Guide to Mining

338214EDO Tasmania is hosting a launch for the Community Guide to Mining at the Old Woolstore, Hobart on 3 September 2014.

EDO Tasmania has prepared a Community Guide to Mining (the Guide), a publication designed to assist the community to understand their rights and responsibilities and to engage effectively in the decision-making process in regards to mining in Tasmania.

The legal framework regulating mining and unconventional gas in Tasmania is complex and confusing, particularly for the uninitiated. Community groups, farmers and landholders have voiced concern and uncertainty about their legal rights and responsibilities regarding mineral exploration and extraction.

The launch is an opportunity to hear a bit more about the Guide, the upcoming workshops and to grab your free copy!

If you are interested in attending the launch, please make sure you register as numbers are limited: http://bit.ly/1nV6m0g